Attorneys’ Corner: Authorized Excellence: Erika Marshall-Story

By Brian Poe Esq.

Attorney Erika Marshall-Story is one of the chosen.

The Bronx County District Attorney’s Office in New York City snagged her immediately after she graduated Temple University’s Beasley School of Law. She prosecuted more than 2,000 cases ranging from drug offenses to murders. Indeed, her impressive tenure included an invitation to join the elite Senior Prosecutors, Housing Task Force Unit — an honor arising out of her triumph in a challenging, six-week felony drug trial case.

After 10 years in the Bronx, she gathered her family and headed south — reacquainting herself with the big leaf magnolias, flowering dogwoods, and trident maple trees in her native Atlanta. She joined the Fulton County District Attorney’s Office as Senior Attorney under the direction of Paul Howard. Charged with managing the Neighborhood Fresh Start Unit, Marshall-Story seized properties used for criminal activity and repurposed them as residential homes for police officers.

Her dexterity and prowess later attracted attention from the Fulton County Commissioner’s Office, where, in 2007, Chairman John Eaves was establishing Fulton County’s first international student exchange initiative. As legislative director and senior policy administrator, Marshall-Story oversaw The Global Youth Leadership Program and developed policy and programming. She managed the Fulton County’s Reentry Task Force, and was a key member of the team trusted with creating the first regional transit map.

Marshall-Story served as an administrator with the Fulton County Superior Court and is currently the principal owner of The Marshall Story Law Group, a criminal defense and civil litigation firm.

1.  What were some of your biggest accomplishments as a prosecutor in New York City? I investigated and prosecuted two major narcotics cases that involved wiretaps, and interstate and out of country trafficking. The matter was jointly prosecuted with the United States Attorney, Eastern District of New York, High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area office, and with a special narcotics task force. It led to a major indictment of some high level traffickers and was a great experience working with the United States Attorney’s Office.

2. Are there any differences between the practice of criminal law in New York City and Atlanta? The biggest difference between New York and Atlanta is that New York has a uniform court system and all records throughout the state are centralized. There are also tremendous resources for drug and behavioral health programs, which are priority and major factors in providing sentencing options.

3. During your hiatus from the practice of law, how valuable was your training? I was able to work within county government and learn more about the budgeting and finance process as well as how decisions are made that support the framework of both the county and the state.

4. How do you expect your experiences to benefit your practice now that you head your own firm? I now have a very holistic understanding of the criminal justice system, as well as county and state government. Understanding not just the practice of law, but how the county and criminal justice system work as a whole makes me a more competent attorney and able to provide the best representation possible to each client.

5. As an Atlanta native, do you believe relationships will have a positive impact on your independent practice? It’s wonderful to walk into a courtroom and see someone I may have known growing up, and be able to converse with that person on a professional level, and have some personal history as well. As I transition into independent legal practice, professionalism, trust, and a bit of humor will always go a long way toward maintaining and building new relationships. AT

 

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